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CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 9:00am EDT
to a brilliant woman about why is it you are allowed -- able to make splendors in the united states and sell them to specialty coffee shops. jody explained the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blenders. they don't want any noise. you go to a bunch and noble or chain stores and they have the starbucks fare and they're making noise and won't wonder and go into the stores. they want to make sure there is no noise in the blenders. secondly for those who enjoyed cappuccino you know you don't want ice chips so make sure the blenders actually crushed the ice chips properly. so what jody was able to do was actually work with the specialty coffee shops on the design of the blunders they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something and interacting with them would be very complicated. the customization of products that allow a small and medium-sized manufacturers know is inherently possible to do in the united states and it wasn't just jody engage in this
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 9:00am EDT
democratic majority in the house and senate and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still fairly and the control of liberal democrats. 4 two brief shining years or perhaps baleful years if you don't like the great society but for two years for better or for worse the united states had a government in the way that we often seek of her majesty, having a government that is a group of people who can implement a party platform that can be judged at the next election or serious elections. that is not generally the way the united states operates. courtesy of the constitution drafted in 1787 and what i want to in sister relatively unamended thereafter with regard to the basic structures we live under. the republican president, president johnson, nixon, ford, reagan and george h. w. bush not for a single day had even a single house of congress from their own political party. ronald reagan did have the senate for four years but he never had a full congress that was republican. bill clinton did have a full congress that was republican but bill clinton was democrat. and
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 8:15pm EDT
and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 10:45am EDT
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2012 7:00pm EDT
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 2:15pm EDT
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 11:45am EDT
here is a young man who is the half brother of the president of the united states, barack obama is not only of multimillionaire but the most powerful man in the world. and yet his half-brother can't call him in a time of need and this same half brothers living in a 6 x 10 at slum dog millionaire style in nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. this is a a guy not just living in poverty but in third-world poverty. what is going on here? the simple explanation is barack obama is a hypocrite. he has made the ideas that we have obligations to our fellow man the centerpiece of his reelection campaign, one of his favorite lines he recently added at the national prayer breakfast is we are our brother's keeper. in my film "2016: obama's america," the film is coming to michigan. look at our website 2016themovie.com. in the film i asked george, obama says we are our brother's keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? quite revealing the george says go ask him. hypocrisy would seem to be the natural explanation. george is not an isolated case.
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 8:45am EDT
to me. now, i thought to myself, here 1 ssh -- is a young man, half brother of the united states. barack is not only a multimillionaire, but the most powerful man in the world. yet his half brother can't call him in a time of need, and this same half brother is living in a six by ten hut slum dog millionaire style in the slum of the nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. this is a guy not just living in poverty, but in third world poverty. what's going op here? the simple explanation is that barack is a hypocrite. he has made the idea we have obligations to our fellow man, the center piece of his reaction campaign. one of his favorite lines that he recently uttered at the national prayer breakfast is, "we are our brother's keeper." in my film, 2016, by the way, the film is coming to michigan. just look at the website, 2016itmovie.com. [applause] in the film, i asked george that. i said, george, obama said you are our brother's keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? revealingly, george says, go ask him. hypocrisy seems to be the natural ex
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 10:45am EDT
is the half-brother of the president of the united states. barack obama is not only a multimillionaire, produced the most powerful man in the world. and yet his half brother can't call him in a time of need and the same half brother is living in a six by 10 hut slum dog millionaire style in their room a slump of nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. so this is a guy that they not just in poverty, but you have to say in third world poverty. so what is going on here? the simple explanation is that barack obama is a hypocrite. he has made the idea that we have obligations to our fellow man the centerpiece of his reelection campaign. one of his favorite lines, which he recently uttered at the national prayer breakfast as we are our brothers keepers. and my film, 2016. by the way, the film is coming to michigan. you should look at our website 2016 the movie.com. [applause] but in the film, i asked george that. i say george, obama says we are our brothers keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? harborview and make george says go ask him. so h
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 3:00pm EDT
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 7:15am EDT
lived, or james madison, or abraham lincoln, would united states exist? if it did exist would be the same country we know to be? what other people have, thought, fill the shoes and done what they did, or would things be markedly different? for our purposes tonight, the question is if william f. buckley, jr. had not lived, what conservatism be what it is today or would it be different? would have been a conservative movement? had there been a conservative movement, which it had achieved the same success that it has achieved? i'm going to put that question aside for a moment and try to circle back to it later. let's start with who was buckley. well, he had six different careers, or he did things that would have been, would have filled careers for six people and made them whole and quite a few successful. let's start with the fact he was a syndicated columnist. he wrote for many, many, many years. in fact, up until he died, a column called on the right. at its height it was published three times a week in 350 newspapers. he was one of the most widely read columnists in the countr
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 3:45pm EDT
reach its foreign policy goals while under the wing of the united states which he says count always have israel's -- doesn't always have israel's best interests at heart. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> shalom, good evening, everybody. it is my pleasure to be here with you, especially when you have such great weather in washington. almost like jerusalem at this time of the year. i am very happy to see so many people coming and showing an interest in my book, and i would like in the next 20 minutes to share with you not what you're going to read in the book, but what's behind the ideas. but first i want to think we all can agree that's what's happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. and because we are in the middle east today being attacked, so you have to ask yourself why those people are against the jewish nation in the middle east. the arab against israel not because of the land that we so-called occupied. we are being attacked be
CSPAN
Sep 1, 2012 3:45pm EDT
through small local banks or sometimes large local banks. what happens is people in the united states and europe who fund these things generally go through an intermediary so they give their money to institutions such as kiva, a famous one that you -- deutsche bank, citibank, the traditional wall street companies, dedicated microfinance funses such as blue orchard, the biggest one in the order, and then you have the foundations. so in d.c. we have two examples, such as the foundation u.s.a. and calvert foundation but there are whole hot of these institutions. you give your money to one of these intermediary asks they apparently invest this in the -- in your best interests and in the best interests of the poor by channeling this money to these small banks in developing countries that are going to do effective microfinance. that's the idea. that's the theory. >> well, this book has been promoted and my understanding is that members of the church congregations, people making responsible investments are flocking to this opportunity. tell us about some of the people providing the money. >>
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2012 3:00pm EDT
give me pleasure to say[a that i was introducing the next president of the united states. [cheers] [applause]ep and it would give you a lot of pleasure as well, i'm sure. millions whon woke up in is wh disappointment on november 3, they might be looking to what our guest will be doing in theeu immediate future.on the jou based on the journey and the stance he has taken, many americans should rejoice overict that the voice they will have ir their government. the a voice that speaks for expanding opportunities and civil liberties. a voice that speaks to the promise that will help us come out of the long local darkness. obamse join me in welcoming the man behind not always, barack obama. [cheers]thank yo [applause] [cheers] [applause] >> thank you, thank you. thank you. thank you very much.. [cheers]ppreciate it [applause] thank you, i appreciate it. thank you very much. thank you so much. but i know that i made a speech tha] there are no red states and blue states, but i suspect that thisc state is kind of blue looking at the crowd out here tonight. what a magnificent turnout. i am
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 1:45pm EDT
in the united states. we at the bush center -- are here with the their spouses we're fortunate to be associated with smu. our relationship with smu competed our expectations. i hope we have exceeded your expectations. we're very much involved in action oriented programs. i didn't want to be known as a think tanker. i want to be known as an a,-oriented place that can make a difference in the world. and so i want to thank you very much for having faith in us when we first convince you to support the bush center on the smu campus. we just got back from africa which is. we went over there because at the bush center, one of the major initiatives is to honor human life. we believe all life is precious. whether they live in america on the continent of africa. we are disturbed by the fact that many women who have got the hiv virus, are getting cervical cancer not much is being done with it with your help we put together a collaborative effort to save lives. part of the mission was to kick off the red ribbon in bots wanna as well as to follow up in zambia where we kick it off in december. we wanted to g
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 6:00am EDT
at what was going on in the united states. and you can even see this in henry kissinger's memoirs and on historical record and an archives in our archives over here how the negotiator for the north vietnamese would bring this up to kissinger. he would bring up what was going on in congress, was going on in the streets to try to rattle kissinger who would always answer this is beneath me, i'm not going to talk about what's going on in the united states. at any end i i believe that north vietnamese leaders never really relied on negotiations to win the war. they knew that they had to win on their own and it had to be militarily on the ground. thank you. >> several years ago i had the opportunity to travel around the it now for six weeks, about half the time in the north, which is to be the north, about half the time in the south. and in talking with people, my impression was people in the north, very proud of having defeated the united states, the great power. people in the south, very sad that the united states hadn't in some way managed to stay, to keep with economists. is that co
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2012 1:15am EDT
'm not trying to say new york is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we're all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time, new york is the great magnet for immigrants, from around the world from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward has been a place where discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political culture, their own loyalties and allegiances come in their ethnic and national religious cultures and have ended up jostling each other often. and especially at times of war, this has been the case in new york. sometimes with tragic consequences. so i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting today. so this is april of 1861, after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in this world war began. this is one of the mass rall
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2012 4:00pm EDT
obama who emerges as a whole global treen amex systems until he becomes president of the united states. >> host: >> guest: in butler county is where obama's mother grew up and natalie and the rest of the store in topeka which is the state capital because he lived there for a short time. his father, the president's great grandfather was an auto repair man and a great-grandmother was married at age 15 and a very difficult marriage but in the book begins with suicide in topeka and then stanley, the president's grandfather comes back to butler county and that's where he reads the grandmother and the story begins but it wouldn't have happened without but suicide. >> host: we want to show a montage shot by your wife on your trip to kansas in april, 2009. >> in all conversations [inaudible conversations] >> a >> it's where his great grandmother committed suicide, and stan dunham, obama's grandfather, was 8 years old aty the time, and his mother, obama's great grandmother, died. they lived in the little house here down on buchanan street down a few blocks, and the great grandfather, ralph dunh
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 8:00am EDT
the constitution of the united states? would you, please, recite the constitution? [laughter] have you ever read the constitution if. >> no. >> what's your favorite part? >> i like the bit around the edge. [laughter] i like that. the sort of, like the old pirate map kind of coffee-stained looking bit. >> who wrote the constitution? >> george madison. >> that's not a person. >> washington? >> that is a person, but that's incorrect. >> george jefferson? [laughter] correct, final answer. do i win? >> have you realize the constitution? >> no, but i did see the movie. [laughter] great. >> there is no movie. >> spoiler alert. sorry. >> that's why i rewrote the constitution. [laughter] good night, everybody, thank you very much. [applause] that explains it all. that is just the tip of the iceberg. in my research for this book or, as i like to call it inevitably, my mesearch, forgive me -- [laughter] yes, more american teenagers can name the three stooges than the three branches of government, pretty shocking. almost three-quarters of americans believe of the people, by the people, for the people is in
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 12:00pm EDT
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 2:45am EDT
african-american writers on the election of barack obama, 44th president of the united states. [applause] next we have professor cornell west. [applause] with cornell as we all know is another national and international icon and in national treasure in his own right. he is a professor of civil rights activists philosopher, human rights activist who and really one of the boldest public intellectuals that we have in the united states today. he speaks truth to power even when when he speaks is unpopular he has the structure to be critical and against the grain even when it's hurt him and is standing in the black community. so cornell's latest book is the rich and the rest of us and we are proud and happy to have him here today. [applause] next we have fred harris, who is professor of political science at columbia university where he directs the institute for research and african-american studies. [applause] professor harris's latest book is the price of the ticket, barack obama and the rise and decline of black politics and professor harris is one of the leading scholars of african-american
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 8:00pm EDT
to that viewer in atlanta? >> guest: yes. we both believe that it is important for the united states to play an expansive role, important for america and people of other countries, and that costs money, and it's going to be difficult to find the money with whars coming. the wars we fought in the last decade in afghanistan and iraq, they were expensive, controversial, probably always be controversial, but we ought to recognize as well that the biggest obligations we have, the greatest pressure on taxpayers and on our fiscal policy comes not from those wars or policies people disagree about, but the policies we all believe in, programs everybody wants, namely social security and especially medicare, and unless and until we find ways to reform those programs to make them more affordable, we're going to continue to have trouble, both abroad and at home. >> host: and the last call for our two guests comes from bill in california. first of all, bill, where in california are you, and then go ahead and ask your question. >> caller: marina del ray. >> host: thank you. >> caller: okay. i never hear di
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 10:00am EDT
in a factory, and vanzetti had an odd job after immigrating to the united states and he had started working as a fish vendor. they were ordinary immigrants, but in the united states, they became radicalized of the anarchist leader who advocated violence. but it was ordinary, and i think the fact that they were just too ordinary guys caught in a nightmare that it's part of the reason we are still talking about this today. we think they are there for the grace of god. >> finally, susan tejada come something about your book was april 15th, 1920 you put it in context. it was also the opening day of the boston red sox baseball season, first year without babe ruth. why do you do that, why you put it in the larger context? >> i really hoped to bring their readers and to the story to make it seem real so that the readers might feel they are in the courtroom, they are in the prison and in the death chamber. it's important to make history come alive. >> susan tejada this is your first book right? >> first adult book. >> you've written children's books? what is the name of one? >> i've written childre
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 10:15am EDT
to welcome to distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of the united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitutional accountable lee center. thanks for the opportunity to collaborate with you. the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence for nation had, the constitution did not get as much attention. not as stirring as the declaration, and it's for parchment pages to the declarations single sheet deter most casual readers. the lack of celebration or to its image. over the years it was exposed to sunlight and smoke but the constitution was never exhibited . when you view both the original documents upstairs in the rotunda you immediately see the difference. the declaration stated to the point of eligibility while the constitution which nearly as fresh as it did when describe presented it to the continental convention -- constitutional convention. celebrating constitution day on september 17th has been a longstanding tradition here of the national arch
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 10:00pm EDT
in the united states of america. gratitude of the sacrifices. gratitude to the opportunities it affords. gratitude where the military. gratitude to be a part of this experiment of representative democracy. liberals hate that. today is -- america is just okay. not okay as france. almost as we did. [laughter] i have to ignite charcoal i can hear them behind me trying to figure out. conservative women. mouth the ladies and if i ruling was the olympic sport they beget the gold medal every time. to see it allowed brett drop the following words i was thinking about something sarah palin said the ad bereday. [laughter] stand back. what the half of puff begin. it doesn't matter how you finish the sentence. sarah palin like stock ice-cream or she thinks panda bears are cuddle the. it is a deranged automatic rejection everything she says or thinks. says try it with an coulter. you have the same reaction. any well-known female nine apologetically female. you get the olympic global i ruling. liberals hate mouth the conservative women. the new generation of women that rejects the 1970's era feminist
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 7:00pm EDT
'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. just gratitude with a sacrifices of my fore bearers. gratitude for the -- men and women who serve the flag in the military proudly. gratitude for being a part of this amazing and noablging experiment in representative democracy. boy, liberals hate that. american to them is just okay. not good, not great, not exceptional. okay. about as okay as sweden. not quite as okay as france. when i walk out of the store after coffee shop, i have to admit i chuckle a little bit. i can hear them behind me trying to figure it all out. conservative women mouthy lazies. [applause] you know, if -- liberals would win the gold medal. to see truly elaborate drop the following words in to a conversation. i was thinking about about sarah palin said the other day. [laughter] stand back! let the huffing and puffing and sighing and mowning begin! it doesn't matter how you finish the sentence. sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thinkings coffee is good. sarah palin thinks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deran
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 5:00pm EDT
for the united states because there were so the last generation had been in the desert, that has been the training facility of choice. so a lot of young men and women have gone through twentynine palms to train. so defined by the military in so many ways. it's such a fraught place. the tense marigold desert and meets a different light ratepayer because the highway north is the marine base. the highway south is joshua tree national park. [inaudible] >> i read something maybe two years ago was this article in l.a. grohl from the east coast originally, from new york. and if as hot as new cool and was telling everybody to go out, saddle up and buy stuff in coachella and india, go out their. it's like kind of palm springs was this thing and now i want to know how you see extreme poverty versus this incredible opulence and well fed kind of new money. like i just wondered what she think. what happens when filming? do they ever meet up? >> the short answer is they do when they don't. they had a new desert bohemia. they were writing about me and the friends i was tanya at the very beginning. w
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 1:00pm EDT
in the united states and because our wars of the last generation have been in the desert, that is the training is a good choice. so a lot of young men and women have gone through 29 homes to train. so what is defined by the military in so many ways. it is such a fraught place for the 10 spec oracle desert in the supply desert meet in a fault line right there in because the highway north is the marine base. the highway south is joshua tree national park. [inaudible] >> i read something a few years ago, like maybe three years ago there was an article in outlay. it says hot is the new cool canoeist telling everybody to go out and saddle up and buy stuff in coachella and india and go live out there. it's like kind of palm springs with this being and i want to know how you see extreme poverty and dysfunction verses like this incredible opulence and while some kind of new money. like i just wondered what you think. like what happens -- do they ever meet up? >> the short answer is they do and they don't. i know the article yore talking about. "the los angeles times" had a spread called new desert eme
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 9:00am EDT
announcing in the quietest most resurgent way possible that i'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. gratitude for the sacrifices of my forebears. gratitude for the opportunity this country a force. gratitude for the men and women who served to fight in the military probably. gratitude for being a part of this amazing, ennobling experience representative democracy. blood, liberals hate the americans event is just okay. not good, not great. serving unexceptional. just okay. conservative women, mouthy ladies. to see some truly a lover i want, in your next conversation with a liberal, i was thinking about something sarah palin said the other day. stanback. led to the huffing and puffing and sighing and moaning begin to get as much as you finish the set by the way. you could say sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thanks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deranged automatic rejection of anything sarah palin says or thinks. try with ann coulter. same reaction. actually try with any well-known female who is unapologetically
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 9:45pm EDT
is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we are all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time new york is a great magnet for immigrants from around the world, from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward, has been a place for discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political cultures, the room loyalties and allegiances their ethnic and natural visages cultures and have ended up jostling each other. and especially at times of war come of this has the case in the year, sometimes the tragic consequences. i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting tonight. so this is april of 1861 after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in the civil war began.
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 11:00pm EDT
you call him having a conversation with the president of the united states. talk a bit about that conversation. >> well you know, i was actually here in new york. i had just been on that you and was in a limo on the way to the airport with cnn when i received a call that was a 404 area code. it was a plan to so i answered it and was congressman john lewis. when we finished talking i decided i should take my text messages because i couldn't keep my voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages so lo and behold there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. so i called the number and they wanted to arrange the call, so it was so interesting these people in the media. the person who was in the car with me from cnn pulled out a camcorder and i said, you cannot take me while i am talking to the president, so i made her turn it off and put it away. [applause] so, he started out by saying you are a hard person to reach. well everyone knew i had been with cnn all week. but anyway, he started out and you know they would be calling me about a p
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 12:00am EDT
was then president of yale university, said the united states has quote offended providence because we formed our constitution without any acknowledgment of god unquote and yet in spite of this overwhelming historical evidence the founders did indeed strive for that separation that thomas jefferson spoke of. most religious right leaders today continue to mock the very concept of a secular state. as the rc at -- ozzie and harriet world, the more religious right extremists have become more and more shrill about the cultural changes that have taken place over the past few decades and that will surely continue and their increasing contempt for social tolerance and personal liberty which are really hallmarks of a limited government they profess to believe in indicates i think that they're no longer reliable partners are allies for those republicans and conservatives who actually do believe in limited government and individual rights. i think the so-called three-legged stool symbolizing the republican, the traditional republican coalition made up of economic conservatives, national conservatives and so
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 2:00pm EDT
that occurring. so united states, for example, is very polarized right now. the media has become very polarized. and people are going in to what we call echo chambers they only listen and watch and read some media, and they hear the same story over and over and over again. and other people watch endless and read this other media. that's not 100% true, by the way, there is some people crossing over. there is a large enough section of society that are doing that. one of the most important issues facing us today is the issue of climate change. now just this week, we heard something like 98% of the green land ice sheet is melting. we have been seeing drought across the country, massive drought. food prices are shooting up. they're expecting ocean levels to really rise quite a bit proceeding the coastline. extreme weather getting worse, and no policy action. why no policy action. what's going on? why aren't follows makers doing? why aren't people getting out of their suvs? climate change is really hooping. well, to some people it's not really happening. in fact it's worse than not really happening b
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 6:00pm EDT
management paradigms' for too long in the face of competition from beyond the united states. well the lessons learned -- well the lessons learned from how he it up to that general motors to the changing environment especially in the aftermath of 1920 be heated by a different generation of managers and executives. what ever be possible for any large enterprise to achieve the kind of turnaround he accomplished and then continue to grow for some years? the answers to such questions grow more complex as the change and reaction accelerates. of the legacies and adolescence brought for the world grew all the more relevant to those who would be players. with that i will be glad to take questions. i'm told that because of the sound system we have you should wait until the microphone reaches you can't stand up before asking a question. >> in the front row. >> great book, mr. pelfrey. one question i have listed in irony. i noticed in your book you say that general motors was a top seller of the vehicles in japan prior to world war ii and there's the irony. what happened there? >> that's absolutely true
CSPAN
Sep 4, 2012 12:00am EDT
york city was the vice capital of the united states. and it was an open secret it was the vice capital. it dangled more opportunities for prostitution, gambling and all-night drinking than any other city. 40,000 prostitutes worked in new york. some in brothels some on the street. there were illegal casinos, booking. this was the town teddy roosevelt was going clean it up in 1895. visitors could immediately sense the wicked possibility of the place. new york new york city had a nude weather vane. at the highest point in midtown see at the top of madison square. you can see it clearly from the ground and, you know, jay leno called the statute of liberty the hood ornament. nude diane was the hood ornament want breasts outstretched arms told new yorkers the direction of the winds. near madison square garden was the restaurant and can casino. there was a forgotten hotel there. and this housed one of the city great landmarks. it's a tame picture of it. you got a sense of an art gallery type bar. here's a better reason why thousands upon thousand of tourists came. william f a former manager c
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 6:00pm EDT
plight. in fact, there was considerable pressure from the united states. this changed his mind that not a single bit. he said it was an erroneous mistake. he wasn't entirely sure that he wanted to live, but when it came clear to him that they might on anna, that she could conceivably die at the hands of the nazi's, he became relatively convinced that he was willing to give up. so what the hell of others, he did accomplish this. it involved a strange man who was one who took over and the colonel had a great deal to gain in making things difficult for freud. not a [inaudible] about what to do with freud. the one who had taken over for psycho analysis in berlin, there is considerable danger there. considerable danger for freud. it took, a tremendous strategist who loved freud dearly, a remarkable analyst, the last thing that she did was [inaudible] he wanted to do these five and 10 minute sessions. and redmond freud was going to give you a good 50 minutes. and that was the way it was supposed to be. after the end of the day, they took anna, she was not only extremely resourceful,
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 2:00pm EDT
and les rigist religiou activism in the united states based on a dressferent interpretation what the bible commands. the national council of churches has existed for 60 years and has advocated modern welfare state as an ethis imple, perfect ethi of service to others. the catholic left as a rich history of this activis modern environmental movement is fond of askintheyrhetorically wt would jesus drive. time christian principles to environmental activisits green economy so there is no shortage of political movements across the spectrum trying to run other people's lives. one thing they all have in common is justifying their respective agendas on the basis of biblical not this in my view is precisely why poe need to keep organized religion as far from the halls of congress as possible. another fshororite chl soter i review is chapter 5, the tea party nation anti-gay. most of the media will automatically answer yes or hell mands and the reality is that t party is a more complex and diverse movement and many ot it is emphatically not a mirror image of the christian rigy an although there is of
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 7:30pm EDT
this in the book, which is what you call i'm having a conversation with the president of the united states. [laughter] tell us what he thinks about it now. talk a bit about that conversation. >>well, you know, when he was -- when i was actually here in new york, i had just been on "the view," and was in a memo on the way to the airport with cnn when i received a call that was 404 area code, it's atlanta so i answers that. it was congressman john lewis. when he finished talking i decided i should check my text messages. i couldn't keep my voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages. there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. so i called the number, and they wanted to arrange the call, so it's so interesting the people in the immediate yew. the person who was in the car with me from cnn start the pull out a camcorder, i said you cannot tape me while i'm talking to the president. so i made her turn it off, and put it away. [applause] so he started out by saying you're a hard person to reach. [laughter] well, everyone knew i'd been with cnn all w
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 11:45am EDT
this in the book, this is what you call i'm going to have a conversation with the president of the united states. [laughter] tell him a few things about the jim crow south. [laughter] talk about that conversation. >> well, you know, he was -- when -- i was actually hear in new york, and i had just been op "the view," and i was in a limo on the way to the airport with cnn when i received a call. it was 404 area code, atlanta, and i answered that. it was congressman john lewis. when we finished talking, i decided to check my text messages because i couldn't keep voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages, and low and behold, there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. i called the number, and they wanted to arrange the call so -- interesting these people in the media, the person who was in the car with me from cnn started going in her purse to pull out a cam corder. i said you cannot tape me while i'm talking to the president. i made her turn it off, and made her put that away. [applause] he started out by saying you're a hard person to reach. well,
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2012 10:00pm EDT
publication in the united states. lundy had to leave town as well. he was charged in 1833 -- he wrote an article that was well-known in washington at the time. a black woman was walk across the bridge of the potomac and the constable started chasing her. and people in washington knew what that meant. constables supplemented her income by kidnapping free blacks and selling them into slavery. the woman admitted she was being chased, she fell into the stream and drown. they got ground and buried her. lundy wrote an article and said, look, here's what happened, here is the name of the constable. if the district attorney is going to do something about it, then congress should do something about it. and so he hit the roof. he was this. he immediately charged monday with libel. he was always trying to drive the anti-slavery people out. they wanted to get rid of the anti-slavery forces in washington. and so lundy did the same thing that garrett said. he was facing like a thousand dollar fine, which would be, $20,000 or $100,000 in today's money. he collected one last meal from his friends and
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 4:00pm EDT
't quite that extreme, but there are still subtle things that are cur. so the united states, for example, is very polarized. right now. the media has been very polarized and people are going in to what we call ecochambers they only listen and watch and read some immediate why. and they hear the same story over and over and over again. and other people watch and listen and read the other media. it's not 100% true, by the way, there is some people who cross over. there is a large enough section of the society that are doing that. so one of the most important issues facing us today is the issue of climate change. we heard that 93% of the ice we've been seeing drought across the country. food prices are shooting up. there are expecting ocean levels to really rise quite a bit receding the coastline. extreme weather getting worse, and no policy of action. why no policy action? what's going on in the policy realm? why aren't policy makers doing something? why aren't people getting out of their suv? maybe climate change isn't happening. to some people, it's not happening. in fact, it's worse tha
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 5:00pm EDT
amount of people looking at the total united states, but the amount of power and the amount of influence that they project into politics is just astoppedding, and they do it -- astounding, and they do it all behind closed doors. we go into that in great detail in the book where we got information from the freedom of information act from secret meetings that went on. the other thing about union heads that people don't realize is they are truly the 1%. they talk about -- unions talk about the 1% and occupy wall street, but the guys are making huge amounts of money. huge ams. the secretary treasure makes $845,000. many employees make over $# -- $200,000. it is astounding, truly the 1% spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on private planes, ready access to the white house. they are invited to the best events at the white house. these are not little guys that work their way up. i mean these are truely the 1 #% that they talk bo their members about. >> [inaudible] >> the boilermaker union, a private sector, if you use their logo on an article as i did, we get something from their law firm
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 2:00pm EDT
is as a group, of the new businesses that have been starting in the united states 25% of them have been started by hispanic, latino entrepreneurs and african-americans have lagged. i think one reason is because of integration there are some cultural issues such as starting businesses, access to capital and a lot of, with the unemployment rate i think a lot of very highly accomplished african-american college graduates come into the public sector and we know the public sector is shrinking even as the private sector hires will continue to shrink in one reason they went to the public sector, those jobs or were posted. it's not the byzantine how did i get that job? these were jobs they could compete for for and open spaces and i think that has reaped incredible havoc on the middle class. is an issue i know that reverend jesse jackson has made a top priority and it's an issue every year that ted thinks about an eddie thinks about and there's a lot of focus right now and how do you bring back where the jobs are going to be with small-business entrepreneurship and you know frankly silicon valley. ther
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 8:30pm EDT
was basically the here sherlock holmes of the united states and incredible reputation of the dblght. he made himself rich by taking gifts. he-- roosevelt could not tolerate the behavior. a world wind trying to swept the corrupt era out. you can't imagine the courage of the man to come in to a city that was this corrupt and this used to doing it a certain way and reckless reformers attitude change the whole place around. it's amazing. anyhow, arthur wrote a front page item ten days in to roosevelt's tenure for the new york world, he say we have a real police commissioner his name is though door vees roosevelt. he speaking english accurately. i done it or i seen it. he talks more like a boston man or englishman than a new york police commissioner. the voice is the hardest trial. it is an campus rating voice, a raspy voice. what do you amount to anyway? in the good old days the own of a voice would have been clubbed. now the bravest policeman must listen to the voice, obey it and seem to like it. they treated roosevelt very well in the beginning. a month in to the job he did something unusual.
CSPAN
Sep 17, 2012 2:00am EDT
the united states. to go from new york city to albany, new york, if you took a hours, that would take you three days, on our own horse or a coach. if you took a boat up the hudson, that would take three days if the wind was right. if the wind was bad it could take you a couple -- ten days to get from new york city to albany. and now on a train it's like, what, few hours. so, yes, there are restrictions that come from not being able to get around. but the flip
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